The American Rescue Plan of 2021: Highlights

The details of the American Rescue Plan 2021 are still being processed BUT we know
that it doesn’t include RMD relief for 2021 nor increased minimum wage. It does
provide both 2020 and 2021 tax filing items. Below, I’ve outlined those that I found
most significant so far.

  1. “Stimulus Checks” For individuals: $1,400 per eligible individual for
    all dependents with stricter phaseout that start at $75K for individuals and at
    $150K for those married filing jointly (MFJ). File early if your 2019 tax filing
    does not qualify you for this stimulus.
  2. Expansion of Child Tax Credit: It provides an increased amount of child
    tax credit for those under $150K (MFJ) AND an increase to $400K (MFJ) in
    earnings for the base credits. In 2021 there should be an opportunity to
    receive more child tax credits for up to $400K.
  3. Extension of Unemployment Compensation: An additional weekly
    $300 Unemployment benefit was added, and coverage was extended until
    September 6th, 2021.
  4. 2020 Tax-free Unemployment Insurance income: For those receiving
    Unemployment Insurance in 2020, up to $10,200 of those earnings will be
    tax-free.
  5. Increased Premium Credit Assistance: Healthcare premium assistance
    extended from 2020 through 2021 with higher earnings.
  6. Tax Credit for Employers to cover COBRA for 3 months: Any
    employee involuntarily laid off will have free full COBRA coverage for 3
    months by the employer who will receive credits for paying their COBRA.
  7. Tax-free student loan forgiveness for the future – if a student loan is
    forgiven by 2025, it will be tax-free.

It will take time to distill what will be relevant for 2021 taxes particularly since we are
all still trying to understand and work through CARES 2020 tax rules and implications
for 2020. For now, it makes sense to slow down the 2020 tax filing and
ensure that your CPA is aware of all of the CARES 2020 and TARP 2021
rules before filing – luckily, we all now have until May 17th.

Edi Alvarez, CFP®
BS, BEd, MS

www.aikapa.com

Caregiving for a Parent or Elder Can be Rewarding

As I read the latest survey which found Americans unprepared for the complex and unpredictable realities of longevity and caregiving, I thought about my own experience. In my case, planning with parents for their wishes has allowed for open and frank conversations that helped to develop trust and understanding. It provided a chance to resolve and express unspoken sentiments and a time to see parents/in-laws as peers. It was also a time for them to share life enriching experiences. In the process of helping them plan for their lifestyle choices and care, I learned something more about them, myself and my family. In my situation it allowed me to recognize how much value I place on having intellectual and meaningful activities.

It was interesting to read, in the survey of caregivers, (called C.A.R.E.—Costs, Accountabilities, Realities, and Expectations) that 60% said caring for two aging parents can be more demanding than caring for two children (ages 3-5). It also found that 66% said that the extra costs involved would have a large financial impact on them, and, perhaps more significantly, 38% said they had not planned for these costs. Most respondents believe the shortfall would be offset from cuts to discretionary living expenses, retirement savings, or from another source of income.

This survey is particularly worthwhile because it reveals a disconnect between the perception and the reality of caring for an elder. The perception is that caregiving is mostly about grocery shopping, cooking and laundry. Whereas, experienced caregivers know that although chores and emotional support play a large part, it is financial support and personal hygiene that are the most stressful and anxiety building aspects of caregiving. The lesson here is that you can best assist your parent or elder by pointing out this disconnect—help with chores is fine and may be necessary, but thinking through how caregiving will be financed and how their physical needs will be met is paramount to avoiding serious challenges.

As they plan their caregiving you should encourage them to agree on the signs that will be used to indicate it is time to seek further assistance with their finances and physical care. It is during these caring conversations about their wishes that you can volunteer ways in which you are willing and able to be of help (but only after you’ve examined your own retirement plan).

As the off-spring of a parent that raised a family, that may have managed a firm and made countless complicated decisions during their careers, it can be difficult to envision your mother or father sometime down the road when logging onto the Internet or even frying an egg seem onerous tasks. A key ingredient to helping them along is to examine honestly what lies ahead and plan accordingly. Encourage them to remain connected to family (they will benefit from increased meaningful contact with a loved one) and to build a fiduciary team for their physical, mental and financial wellbeing. With the right type of built-in support along the way, their retirement can truly be the “golden years,” an immensely satisfying and productive time.

Edi Alvarez, CFP®
BS, BEd, MS

www.aikapa.com

Social Security – Have a plan

Maximize your inflation protected pension plan
– Couples must have a Social Security strategy

According to a recent survey (1) married couples nearing retirement do not maximize their social security benefits.  The vast majority of people are unaware of strategies that could increase their lifetime Social Security benefit by $40,000 or more. Only those with high net-worth or higher income appear aware that couples should have a social security implementation strategy.

Seventy-four percent of people with household income exceeding $200,000 expect to receive advice on Social Security benefit options from a financial planner, compared to only 48 percent of those with household incomes less than $50,000.

Most (77 percent) felt that the best advice to maximize their Social Security retirement benefits would be the Social Security Administration. Unfortunately, SSA personnel are not trained to provide more information than monthly benefit amounts at different election ages, and the SSA prohibits its representatives from dispensing advice.

If you are approaching your full retirement age or are planning on enrolling to receive social security make the investment to evaluate your social security implementation strategy with a qualified financial planner.

(1) survey source form socialsecuritytiming.com

Edi Alvarez, CFP®
BS, BEd, MS

www.aikapa.com

Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)

Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)
(source: The State Bar of California information)

DPOA documents are meant to provide a trusted person to act in your stead.  There are two types of DPOAs that you need to include to care of your needs when you are unable or unwilling to do so.

The Health Care Directive should include the name of an agent or attorney-in-fact who you know will advocate for your health care needs.  This individual needs to be an advocate to ensure that your wishes (not theirs) will be respected and followed.

The DPOA for property (or finances) will handle day-to-day financial transactions that you normally handle; such as, paying bills or signing your taxes if you’re not able.  In addition, if you have a Revocable Trust it is the attorney-in-fact that will transfer non-trust assets to your trust if appropriate.

Know that your DPOAs are only valid while you’re alive.

If you don’t have a DPOA and you are unable to make decisions a court will appoint a professional conservator for you and pay them from your estate.  The court does supervise your conservator but it is often more expensive and cumbersome if your conservator does not know or follow your wishes.

Act now, you never know when you might need assistance to direct your financial or your health decisions.  You can get templates from the State of California or contact an Estate attorney or call us for an internal referral.

*** This blog is provided as information to encourage individuals to make available documents that are legally important in their lives ***

Edi Alvarez, CFP®
BS, BEd, MS

www.aikapa.com